Science and Environment topping the agenda at the white house

National Geographic
In this edition: NASA’s official photographer looks back at his illustrious 30-year career, a butterfly refuge faces threats from a U.S. border wall, and research reveals how an ancient mega-shark died out.
PHOTOGRAPH BY NASA/BILL INGALLS
      Starstruck     
See the best pictures from NASA’s official photographer
As a kid growing up in Pittsburgh, Bill Ingalls wasn’t obsessed with outer space. Then he went to college and landed an internship at NASA. Now he’s the agency’s top official photographer, covering space exploration’s biggest moments—from Apollo moon landing anniversaries at the White House to Soyuz landings in the frigid Kazakh steppe.
VIEW GALLERY
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Further: 1960s Moon Photos Were Developed in Space. Here’s How. +
      Habitat Threat     
Wall set to cut through butterfly sanctuary
Some of the U.S.’s highest concentrations of butterflies live at the 100-acre center, which lies near the U.S.-Mexico border.
Get the Story
      Explainer     
What the new AI initiative does—and doesn’t—mean
The U. S. policy raises many questions, from how AI works to whether it will fulfill our science-fiction dreams or our nightmares.
Get the ins and outs
FERNANDO G. BAPTISTA, DAISY CHUNG, RYAN T. WILLIAMS, CHIQUI ESTEBAN, AND JAIME HRITSIK, NG STAFF; FANNA GEBREYESUS
      Shark Hunt     
Megalodon is definitely extinct—and great white sharks may be to blame
New analysis of the ancient behemoths suggests they disappeared a million years earlier than thought, raising questions about what led to their demise.
Crack Open the Case
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Further: Meet Zuul, the ‘Destroyer of Shins’ Dinosaur +
NUMBER2KNOW
150,000
The approximate number of stars you can cover with your hand if your arm is stretched toward the sky.
Go beyond life on earth
      Changing Planet     
Want to know what your city will feel like in 2080? Look 500 miles south.
As the climate warms up, cities in the northern part of the country will start to resemble their southern brethren.
Feel the heat
      Genius     
This young nuclear engineer has a new plan for clean energy
Leslie Dewan wants to revive technology from the 1960s to solve the problem of climate change today.
Power up
ILLUSTRATION BY DADU SHIN
      Clean Water     
We can’t assume our water is safe to drink. But we can fix it.
Everyone has a right to clean water, yet one-fourth of Americans drink water from systems that don’t meet safety standards. Overcoming this problem begins by fighting to ensure that the issue of clean water rises above partisan politics.
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What we’re reading
Need to send a late valentine? Make one with math. (New York Times)  ››
A devastating injury nearly derailed astronaut Leland Melvin’s career in space. (The Moth)  ››

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